Climate Change Science Since 2007

Publication Date: 
December 7, 2009

This report examines the effects of climate change in the areas of Arctic sea ice coverage, Greenland and Antarctic ice melt, sea level rise and ocean acidification, global average atmospheric temperature and ocean temperature, solar activity, and climate change impacts. Climate change has clearly been accelerating quickly since the IPCC publication of 2007.

Below you will find a video, a link to Paul's webinar (19 Mar. 2010), a powerpoint presentation, and a link to the detailed report in PDF format.

Tritium On Tap

Canada’s nuclear industry releases massive quantities of radioactive pollution on a routine basis. In 2008, Canada's nuclear reactors released 6.6 quadrillion becquerels of tritium. Radioactive tritium gets into our food and drinking water, exposing millions of people to a known carcinogen.

Tomorrow Today: How Canada can make a world of difference

Publication Date: 
April 3, 2008

Issued by the country’s 11 largest environmental and conservation organizations, this document offers practical directions for addressing the number one concern for Canadians – the state of the environment.

The recommendations centre on climate change, energy use, food production, toxic substances, water, forests and oceans.

Threats to Our Water

Publication Date: 
April 11, 2007
Threats to Our Water: NAFTA, SPP, Atlantica, Super-Corridors describes the Security and Prosperity Partnership for North America, NAFTA Super-Corridors, and cross border regions like Atlantica and how they threaten to put our water up for sale. The 55 slide presentation is based on extensive research by Dr. Janet M Eaton, Sierra Club of Canada liaison to the Water Privatization Task Force of Sierra Club (U.S.)

Nuclear Power: Not Safe, Not Clean, Not Economical, Not for Ontario

Publication Date: 
July 7, 2006
The McGuinty government in Ontario has announced that it plans to pour an additional $45 billion into nuclear power. It’s a technology that has a proven track record of being unsafe, unsustainable and uneconomical. Many people in Ontario believe that $45 billion in public expenditures could be more safely and effectively invested in renewable energy and conservation. We agree.

A green energy plan for Ontario

Publication Date: 
June 12, 2006
While the McGuinty government has taken the position that new nuclear plants are required for Ontario's future electricity requirements, a coalition of environmental groups have released a report outlining how the province's electricity requirements can be met through clean energy projects and efficiency. The report shows that energy efficiency and low-impact renewable energy sources are capable of providing twice the projected electricity needs of Ontario by 2020.