Publications

Tar Sands, Environmental Justice & Health

Human health depends on a healthy environment.  When the environment becomes contaminated, we feel the impacts in the form of increases in the rate of disease and infection. Economically and socially marginalized communities are disproportionately affected by these impacts because too often they are the communities closest to the sources of health risks, such as toxic waste sites of tar sands developments.

Tar Sands and Global Warming

Global warming is a worldwide concern considered one of the greatest threats facing our planet today. It will have detrimental impacts on human health, wildlife, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and our economy. According to the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), human activity is the primary driver of global warming. Despite this, greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, and Canada is contributing to further climate change.

Tar Sands & the Boreal Forest

Alberta’s Boreal forest is one of the last wild forests left in the world. It is home to thousands of plants and animals, contains 35% of Canada’s wetlands and, as a functioning whole, stores carbon, regulates climate and filters water. The Boreal forest is an incredible ecosystem that needs protection from the unrelenting pressures of increased oil sands development.

Threats to Our Water

Publication Date: 
April 11, 2007
Threats to Our Water: NAFTA, SPP, Atlantica, Super-Corridors describes the Security and Prosperity Partnership for North America, NAFTA Super-Corridors, and cross border regions like Atlantica and how they threaten to put our water up for sale. The 55 slide presentation is based on extensive research by Dr. Janet M Eaton, Sierra Club of Canada liaison to the Water Privatization Task Force of Sierra Club (U.S.)

Nuclear Power: Not Safe, Not Clean, Not Economical, Not for Ontario

Publication Date: 
July 7, 2006
The McGuinty government in Ontario has announced that it plans to pour an additional $45 billion into nuclear power. It’s a technology that has a proven track record of being unsafe, unsustainable and uneconomical. Many people in Ontario believe that $45 billion in public expenditures could be more safely and effectively invested in renewable energy and conservation. We agree.

A green energy plan for Ontario

Publication Date: 
June 12, 2006
While the McGuinty government has taken the position that new nuclear plants are required for Ontario's future electricity requirements, a coalition of environmental groups have released a report outlining how the province's electricity requirements can be met through clean energy projects and efficiency. The report shows that energy efficiency and low-impact renewable energy sources are capable of providing twice the projected electricity needs of Ontario by 2020.