Groupe Ontario Campaigns

Sierra Club Canada Foundation operates programs that reflect the ongoing concerns and priorities of our members and supporters.

Great Lakes Protection

The Great Lakes hold 1/5th of the world's fresh surface water supply and currently provide drinking water to over 42 million people. The health of these lakes is critical. The Great Lakes Campaign works to address the concerns related to the Great Lakes Basin, water conservation, and pollution prevention. The specific problems in the Great Lakes have changed over time, but the broader issues have remained – those of deteriorating water quality through industrial and municipal uses, fluctuating water levels, flooding, and shoreline erosion.

Grow Our Greenbelt

Sierra Club Ontario's Greenbelt Campaign is currently focused on Protecting and Growing the Greenbelt. Building on support from the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation, Sierra Club Ontario has been making advances in protecting threatened ecosystems in Peel and Durham Region.

Green Energy

The Green Energy campaign’s main objective is to replace dirty fossil fuels and nuclear power by mobilizing grassroots activists in local communities to advocate for the transition to a clean-energy future. Fossil fuels must steadily and gradually be replaced with cleaner and greener sources of renewable energy and conservation. Dangerous, expensive nuclear and polluting fossil fuels must be phased out.

Natural Capital

Natural Capital refers to the stock of natural resources and environmental assets, and how they contribute to building healthy communities. The Natural Capital perspective is a way of placing a monetary value on the benefits, known as ecological goods and services, that nature naturally provides to humans. Examples include: regulating climate, water purification, erosion control, flood protection, and providing health benefits. 

Natural Capital is a way of communicating how much nature is worth, in the hopes to make better policy and development decisions in the future.

Coal Fire Plant Phase Out

In Ontario, coal power plants supply approximately 10% of the energy used to power factories, homes and businesses. However, the negative environmental effects of burning coal are well known: increasing CO2 and methane concentrations in the atmosphere and release of toxic heavy metals.

Pickering Airport/ Duffins Creek

Land in North Pickering was expropriated during the 1970's to be used as an airport. The plans were contested from the start and citizens stopped the original proposal. Now, thirty years later the issue has resurfaced. This time it is not only the lands at risk, but also the last remaining undeveloped habitat to many species.

Waste Diversion

The manner in which we deal with our ''waste" is a key part of the foundation of a sustainable world.  Isn't sustainability another word for balance? We must learn how to use the world's resources such as wood, rocks, metals and oil in a more balanced manner.

Great Lakes Protection

Our Great Lakes Campaign committee is looking at environmental education programs for water conservation and advocating for stronger policies for pollution prevention. We work collaboratively with the Sierra Club Michigan Chapter in the States to implement solutions dedicated to restoring and protecting the health of these lakes.

Other concerns are acid rain, airborne toxics, depletion of wetland areas, increased demands on the shoreline land base. The impacts associated with the introduction of exotic species, and climate change, as well as drug residues in sewage effluent and the discovery that flame-retardants leaking from computers and mattresses are building up rapidly in the tissues of many animals living in the lakes.

Forests and Wildlife

Canada's most important natural resource is its forests which provide timber, pulpwood, wildlife habitat and a wealth of recreational opportunities. But the forests are not limitless and all Canadians must share a renewed commitment to their wise use and management.

Within the conservation movement, sustainable forestry means forest practices that ensure that the structure, function and composition of the forest are maintained in perpetuity. It also entails the equitable distribution of forest resource benefits, and the opportunity for the public to be involved in a meaningful way. After all, the forests of Ontario are ours—88% of forested land is Crown land, held for the people of Ontario in trust by the provincial government.