Sierra Club of/du Canada

SCC Forest Certification Bulletin


Bulletin Number 4 - December 2001


This bulletin has been prepared by the Sierra Club of Canada, and provides a concise summary of key new developments related to certification, with a focus on issues in Canada. It is distributed by email and available on the Sierra Club of Canada’s website at www.sierraclub.ca/national/programs/biodiversity/forests/.

If you have information that you'd like to have added to future editions of the bulletin, or if you'd like to ensure that you receive future copies directly, or if you’d prefer not to receive the bulletin, please contact Martin von Mirbach at forests@sierraclub.ca. And let us know what you think – are you satisfied with the level of detail provided in this bulletin, and with the topics covered?



CO-ORDINATOR HIRED FOR FSC BOREAL STANDARDS PROCESS

FSC Canada has hired Marc Thibault to coordinate the National Boreal Standards Project, assuming overall responsibility for developing a National Standard for the Boreal Forest. Marc is a Conservation Biologist by background, is completing his Masters degree in Forest Science from Laval University and has also completed graduate studies in Freshwater Biology at the National Institute of Scientific Research. He led the development and implementation of an Integrated Conservation and Development project in Gabon, Central Africa, based on a participatory approach involving rural communities, indigenous peoples, environmental interest groups and local industry. He has also conducted numerous projects as a consultant on the state of wildlife and habitats in Quebec, and on the environmental impacts of industrial development on wildlife habitats.



BOREAL COORDINATING COMMITTEE BEING FORMED

FSC Canada is forming a Committee to lead the development of a national boreal standard for Canada. The Boreal Coordinating Committee will be responsible for managing the standards development process, including developing consultation drafts, managing relationships with regional initiatives, ensuring effective communications and ensuring that the timelines and deliverables are met. It is intended to be a small, high-performing, efficient committee, with members selected on the basis of their skills, experience and credibility. FSC Canada is currently seeking suggestions for who should be on the committee. See the FSC Canada website at www.fsccanada.org for more details.



QUEBEC FSC INITIATIVE UNDERWAY

The Québec FSC Initiative has been undertaking meetings this fall to move forward in engaging interested people in the province on FSC issues. The economic chamber met in Trois Rivières on September 27th, and selected candidates for the steering committee. The social chamber interests met in Québec City on November 6th. At the Aboriginal meeting on November 8th recommendations were proposed which would see representatives of the Algonquian, the Innu, the Cree and the Assembly of First Nations of Québec and Labrador all participate in the process. A workshop is planned for Québec City on January 18th to further discuss the proposals in conjunction with the Strategic Directions paper from the IP Conference. Details on the results of those meetings can be obtained from the FSC Québec Initiative’s website at www3.sympatico.ca/fsc_qc/.



FSC-OMNR ACTION PLAN AND STUDIES RELEASED

FSC and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources have agreed to continue the joint review of Ontario’s forest audit processes and forest regulations against the FSC certification system, and the FSC Principles and Criteria as elaborated through the regional FSC standards presently under development. Future work will be aimed at finding opportunities for streamlining the processes required to be undertaken by forest companies, owners or managers towards achieving FSC certification, and defining the ways in which recognition could be given to those organizations, within the FSC certification process, for relevant aspects of the OMNR regulatory and audit systems which they are required to meet. For additional information see www.fscanada.org.



STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS FROM INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ CONFERENCE

A draft Strategic Directions Paper has been prepared as an outcome of the conference on Indigenous Peoples and FSC Certification that took place in Ottawa in August. The paper is available at www.fsccanada.org/pdf_document/direction.pdf and comments on that paper are currently being solicited.



ALBERTA WILDERNESS ASSOCIATION RESIGNS FROM CSA SFM TECHNICAL COMMITTEE

The CSA Technical Committee reviewing its SFM standard has lost another environmental representative, with the resignation on December 3rd of Cliff Wallis, representing the Alberta Wilderness Association. In his resignation letter Wallis stated that “Without meaningful performance requirements, the standard is … not an acceptable performance standard for sustaining Canada’s forests.” This resignation follows the resignation of the Sierra Club of Canada representative in October. The revised standard will be made available to the public at the time that it is voted upon by the remaining members of the CSA Technical Committee.



FSC MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION SIMPLIFIED

The process of becoming an FSC member has lost much of its complexity now with the publications of FSC's Membership Application Kit. The loose-leaf binder contains all the requirements for individual/organization applicants, by chamber. The kit also includes a description of each chamber, current membership dues, and general information about the FSC. Those interested in receiving this material should contact Carolina Hoyos (choyos@fscoax.org) or Ana A. Chávez (members@fscoax.org). As well, FSC’s website (www.fscoax.org) now features detailed membership information and an on-line application. Those interested in becoming FSC members are now able to submit basic application information over the web directly to the membership officer at the Secretariat.



REPORT RELEASED ON IMPEDIMENTS TO FSC CERTIFICATION IN ALBERTA

A recently released report identifies structural impediments to good forest management in Alberta which the authors of the report argue must be addressed by the provincial government before forestry companies can satisfactorily fulfill the requirements of FSC certification. The main impediments are the lack of a scientifically defensible protected areas network for Alberta and the inability of Alberta’s forest industry to manage forests for ecological sustainability due to the forest fragmentation caused by activities of the petroleum industry. The report, by the Alberta Wilderness Association, Albertans for a Wild Chinchaga, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (Edmonton Chapter) and the Federation of Alberta Naturalists, is available at www.AlbertaWilderness.ca.



CERTIFICATION CASE STUDIES REPORT RELEASED

A recently released discussion paper reviews the impacts of certification on local communities by examining case studies from Sweden and Canada, including the Algonquins of Barriere Lake in Québec and the Pictou Landing First Nation in Nova Scotia. The report looks in particular at a range of benefits flowing from the forest – timber, non-timber and non-market benefits – and at how those benefits are distributed. The report is written by Chanda Meek of the Boreal Footprint Project and is available at from the Taiga Rescue Network at www.taigarescue.org/publications/reports.shtml.



CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS

We’re including the most up-to-date information available, but some of these scheduled events may be subject to change.

January 18-20, 2002 - FSC Canada Working Group meeting, Québec City

February 4-8, 2002 - FSC International Board meeting, Oaxaca

April 23-25, 2002 - Rescheduled Certified Forest Products showcase in Atlanta, Georgia, including meetings of the FSC International Board and the FSC Canada Working Group

June 3-7, 2002 - 3rd FSC General Assembly, Oaxaca. The Annual General Assembly will be preceded by two days of meetings for each chamber of the FSC

June 15-16, 2002 - FSC Canada Annual General Meeting, Edmonton



RESOURCES

FSC Canada has upgraded its website with an extensive “References and Documents” section, and specific sections for discussion including a new “Boreal” section. Check it out at www.fsccanada.org.

It is now possible to access a database of all FSC certificates in North America, including their current status. Plans are underway to include certificates from Europe. The database is maintained by the Certified Forest Product Council and is accessible at www.certifiedwood.org.

Developing Forest Stewardship Standards: A Survival Guide is a handbook written by Hannah Scrase and Anders Lindhe, available from the Taiga Rescue Network at www.taigarescue.org.

The FSC/SFI comparison study recently completed by the Meridian Institute, is available at www.merid.org/comparison.

ProForest, a forestry consultant, has written a guide providing practical advice to anyone wishing to set up an FSC group certification scheme. Titled A Practical Guide to Developing a Group Scheme for FSC-Accredited Certification of Forests, the publication can be downloaded from www.cmnet.org.



CONTACT INFORMATION


FSC CANADA
100 Broadview, Suite 421
Toronto, ON M4M 3H3
Tel: 416-778-5568
Fax: 416-778-0044
www.fsccanada.org

FSC CANADA - ENVIRONMENTAL CHAMBER REPRESENTATIVES

Denise English
East Kootenay Environmental Society
Tel: 250-344-2698
Fax: 250-344-2798
Email: denglish@redshift.bc.ca

Martin von Mirbach
Sierra Club of Canada
Tel: 613-241-4611 or 613-569-0034
Fax: 613-241-2292
Email: forests@sierraclub.ca

CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
178 Rexdale Blvd.
Toronto, ON M9W 1R3
Tel: 416-747-4000
Katie Altoft: katie.altoft@csa.ca
www.csa.ca