Wildlife & Natural Spaces

You cannot protect what you do not know. Nature’s diversity exists all around us. SCCF works with individuals, partners and community groups to promote knowledge of wildlife and natural environments. We work to preserve and protect for all to enjoy, both now and in the future.

Species at Risk Feature - Little Brown Bat

The Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) is one of just 18 species of bat found in Canada with the largest distribution of them all. A nocturnal, echolocating insectivore, the little brown bat measures 8-10 cm in length, weighing only a mere 5-14 grams. They range in colour from brown to red-brown, and golden-brown, with female bats presenting as larger than male bats. 

Ontario Forest Under Attack

By Dr John Bacher and Danny Beaton, Mohawk of the Turtle Clan.

In Memory of Alicja Rozanska.

One of the most important environmental battles now going on in Ontario is a debate in the council chambers of Chatham-Kent to decide if the municipality is to have a tree cutting by-law. A temporary by-law has been imposed, but it is scheduled to be lifted on December 14, 2021.

Species at Risk Feature - Bank Swallow

The Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) is a small insectivorous songbird, best known for its swooping and soaring behaviours used to protect their nests, and when catching their insect prey mid-flight. Bank Swallows inhabit low-lying areas typically near rivers, streams, ocean coasts and reservoirs. As a colonial nesting species, bank swallows can be found in large numbers where their nests occur as numerous open cavities and holes in the sides of river banks and sandy embankments.

Funding Policies to Protect Wildlife Webinar

The Watch for Wildlife program of Sierra Club's Atlantic Canada Chapter welcomes you to a lively discussion on why it is necessary to implement measures to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions in order to conserve wildlife and protect motorists in Canada.

Webinar speakers will discuss how participants can reach out to their local Member of Parliament to show their support for the recommendations of the Green Budget Coalition. We will deliver a message that the federal government should:

1. Implement a national wildlife-vehicle collision data reporting system,
2. Make highway and railway funding conditional on an integrated wildlife management plan, including any required crossing structures, fencing and other collision-prevention infrastructure.

Click here to learn more about the Green Budget Coalition: https://greenbudget.ca/(link is external)

 

Speakers:

Gretchen Fitzgerald (She/her) is the National Program & Atlantic Chapter Director for Sierra Club Canada Foundation. With an academic background in marine biology, Gretchen Fitzgerald became Atlantic Chapter Director in 2007 and transitioned to National Programs Director in 2016. She led the campaign to successfully stop oil and gas development in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and secured provincial commitments to ban uranium mining in Nova Scotia. Her passions include her daughter, getting out in the garden, and seeing people use their power to bring about change.

David Snider, Past Board President, currently serves as Sierra Club Canada Foundation’s delegate to the Green Budget Coalition. Degrees in physical geography and law provided him with a broad-based understanding of environmental issues. In 2013 David retired from the Canada Revenue Agency after 30 years working on compliance research, strategy, policy and legislation. He is a life member of the Canadian Kennel Club, a lure coursing judge, and a director on the board of his local historical society. David enjoys hiking, skiing, birding, gardening and getting involved in environmental issues.

Prairie Flora Feature: Prairie Crocus

Today’s featured prairie plant is Anemone patens also known as Prairie Crocus, Crocus Anemone, Pasque Flower or Prairie Smoke. It is best known for being the first flower to bloom following winter, often before complete snowmelt has occurred, signalling the start of spring on the prairies. This long-lived perennial flower is native to Canada and grows on open prairies, along hillsides, roadsides, dry grasslands and open woods.

Canada's Prairie Pothole Region

The Canadian Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) encompasses 467,000km² of wetland and grassland area stretching from Alberta’s Rocky Mountain foothills to Manitoba’s Red River Valley. The appearance of these ‘pothole’ structured wetlands, were formed by the movement of glaciers across North America, where the ice melted into the pools that are now the potholes wetlands we have today. The formation of the pothole region took tens of thousands of years during the Wisconsin glaciation period.

Native Prairie Week

Preserve, Protect and Celebrate Canada's Prairie Ecozone

Native Prairie Appreciation Week is officially celebrated in Saskatchewan from June 13-19 in collaboration with the Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (SK PCAP). It is celebrated nationwide from June 17-22. However, the Canadian prairies boast many incredible ecoregions, unique wildlife and stunning landscapes that should be celebrated all the time!

Job Opening: Watch for Wildlife Outreach Coordinator

We are seeking a dedicated and outgoing individual to help increase the reach and impact of our wildlife collisions prevention program, Watch for Wildlife (http://www.watchforwildlife.ca). The objective of the Watch for WIldlife is to prevent collisions with wildlife and people on our roads and to encourage the implementation of wildlife-friendly road design and vehicle collision mitigation measures.

Indigenous & Environmental Groups Call for Moratorium on Mining Development in Ring of Fire

Sierra Club Canada Foundation has joined Indigenous and environmental groups in requesting a moratorium on a mining development in Ontario's "Ring of Fire". As it stands, the region’s wetlands and watersheds are not protected under this development and local communities, both upstream and downstream, are in need of access to clean water, housing and other health services.