Wildlife & Natural Spaces

You cannot protect what you do not know. Nature’s diversity exists all around us. SCCF works with individuals, partners and community groups to promote knowledge of wildlife and natural environments. We work to preserve and protect for all to enjoy, both now and in the future.

Two Ontario Native Communities On Front Lines To Avert Climate Change Disaster

The Objiway community of Eabametoong and Cree of Nestantaga in northern Ontario have found themselves on the front lines to avert catastrophe from climate change. They are anticipating a three-year struggle to oppose two new roads planned to accommodate mines in what has become known as Ontario’s Ring of Fire. The battle takes place via co-ordinated federal and provincial Environmental Assessments (EAs).

Michelle's Great Big Hiking Adventures

The mountains are calling and I must go. - John Muir quote-

Hiking trails have historical roots as places of transportation for people, goods, livestock, and wildlife with long-distance passages connecting villages and towns. Walking for leisure took place along garden paths or local forested trails. Recreational hiking grew dramatically in North America in the 20th century as leisure time increased post-war. A surge of outdoor recreationists coincided with the environmental movement of the 1960s and 1970s. People felt an attachment to the outdoors and hiking became a means to explore nature, increase fitness, and express individuality. 

Rouge National Urban Park: Opportunities for Enhancing Ecological Integrity

Little Rouge River as seen from Vista Trail platformPhoto by Alex Walker

The Sierra Club Ontario has long supported the protection and re-naturalization efforts within the Rouge Watershed, specifically within the Rouge National Urban Park. The Friends of the Rouge Watershed (FRW) have been advocating for the continued protection of the Rouge, especially as it relates the Rouge National Urban Park (RNUP) Management Plan.

GTA West Corridor Poisoned Dagger Aimed at Lake Ontario

When the Minister of Transportation, Steven Del Duca, announced the termination of an environmental assessment for the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) West Corridor in December of 2015, those who cherish the earth in Ontario gave a great sigh of relief. The proposed 50 kilometer-long expressway planned to slash through entirely environmental and agricultural zones, much of which is protected by the Greenbelt. The plan was a salt tipped dagger on Lake Ontario. 

What Happens Now With the EPCOR Solar Farm?

Charles Richmond speaking with the press at Edmonton City Hall

Written by Jaclyn Layton

With over 72 square kilometres of lush river valley, Edmonton presents a unique intersection of urban and green space. More expansive than Stanley Park of Vancouver (4 square kilometres), or even Central Park in New York City (3.4 square kilometres),  Edmonton’s greenery is an aspect of the city that is celebrated, and therefore should be preserved and protected. The natural wonder of the North Saskatchewan River Valley has been at risk over the past 18 months over a proposed solar farm that would degrade the Valley’s natural state.

THESE SEVEN BABIES

You likely recall the joyous news in the new year at the safe arrival of seven right whale newborns (see the photo album of the 2019 Calves below.)

It was extraordinary news, given that not one baby had been born the year before.

But we find ourselves facing the devastating reality that eight critically important right whales have died in Canadian waters this summer. 

It means these new little lives must be protected on an emergency basis.

I fear for their safety, at such a precarious time in their first precious year of life.

Op-Ed: EPCOR’s Solar Farm – or is it EPCOR’s Railroad?

Edmonton's River Valley, a unique and valuable asset

Edmonton City Bylaw 7188

The North Saskatchewan River Valley Area Redevelopment Plan is a comprehensive plan which envisions the major portion of the River Valley and Ravine System for use as an environmental protection area and for major urban and natural parks.  […] As Edmonton grows and changes and as land becomes more valuable the River Valley may become the threatened by commercial and industrial uses, as well as by civic uses such as public utilities. The municipal level of government has probably exerted the greatest development pressure on the River Valley with public utility proposals and transportation plans. These uses tend to be incompatible with the aims of nature preservation and parkland development.


Those excerpts from our North Saskatchewan River Valley Area Re-development Plan, Bylaw 7188, are found in its purpose, which is explicit in its regard for the importance of protecting our river valley and ravine system.  The details surrounding exceptions are strict, and the bar set high. Give it a read.

Sierra Club Canada Foundation is determined in its effort to conserve our River Valley, Edmonton’s most unique and valuable asset.

OPEN LETTER on Bill C-69 and the Role of Offshore Petroleum Boards

June 13, 2019

 

Dear Ministers McKenna, Sohi, and Wilkinson,

 

The new Impact Assessment Act, Bill C69, will make environmental assessments for offshore oil and gas activities in Atlantic Canada have even less credibility than they do now.

 

The draft amendments to the bill introduced in the House of Commons on June 12 will allow offshore petroleum boards to chair review panels that will assess offshore oil and gas projects.

 

Ontario Chapter hiring two summer interns

We have Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) grants to support two positions: a Research & Communications Intern and 'The Problem with Plastics' Intern.

Please review the job listings below, apply if you are interested, and share with others. We look forward to hearing from you!

Note: to qualify for CSJ positions you must a) be between 15 and 30 years of age at the start of the employment; and b) be a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, or person to whom refugee protection has been conferred.

Sea Change: The Wave of Support for Ending Dolphin Captivity

Oceans Week

Last month, just down the road from Marineland Canada, renowned neuroscientist Dr. Lori Marino gave a talk called, “Crafting the Endgame for Dolphin Captivity in Canada”. Dr. Marino is one of only a handful of dolphin neuroscientists in the world. Author of more than 130 papers, Dr. Marino co-authored the groundbreaking 2001 study which found that bottlenose dolphins could recognize themselves in a mirror. After the study, Dr. Marino refused to conduct further research on captive dolphins.

Provincial Highway Threatens Rare Native Grassland Ecosystem

Written by Warrick Baijius, Endangered Grassland Alliance

Saskatoon, SK, is a vibrant and growing prairie city within an agricultural landscape. But in and around Saskatoon there are some enchanting and ever-changing natural sites, gems that provide a glimpse into pre-settlement landscapes. These areas include complex and diverse combinations of native plant and animal communities, housed and fed in a mosaic of diverse habitats influenced by erosion, grazing, and fire. Some of these areas have fescue and mixed grassland prairie —globally the most threatened ecosystem, and regionally an increasingly rare occurrence (at 5% of original extent for fescue, and 9% to 15% for mixed).