BP Offshore Drill Project Approval Points to Need for Reform, According to Sierra Club Canada Foundation

OTTAWA - Sierra Club Canada Foundation is disappointed, but not surprised, that Federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna approved up to seven exploratory drill wells for BP off Nova Scotia yesterday. The leases where BP will be drilling are located 48 km from Sable Island National Park and 71 km from the Gully Marine Protected Area, home to the Northern bottlenose whale and deep-sea corals. 

Environmental groups in court to intervene in NAFTA tribunal overstep

-- NAFTA tribunal exceeded its jurisdiction when it made determination on what a Canadian environmental assessment panel can decide, groups say --

We are in federal court this week in Ottawa to ensure that original environmental assessments hold related to a US company wanting to set up quarry operations on the pristine shores of Digby Neck, Nova Scotia, in the the Bay of Fundy - home to critcally endangered right whales, important marine species, and upon which thousands of people make their lives and their livelihoods.

A small town, $500M, and the NAFTA court battle

Last weekend, women in Sandy Cove, Nova Scotia organized a Women’s March.  The Sandy Cove Women's March garnered international attention last year as one of the smallest marches in the international event to show strength and solidarity for women’s rights in the face of the Trump presidency.

Sandy Cove holds a special place in my heart, as it was there that I met Carol and Ashraf Mahtab in their lovely home, and around a beautiful lunch table with the people who were dedicated to stopping the Digby Quarry.

The Big Heist: Ottawa Hands Offshore Regulation to Oil Industry

For immediate release

K’JIPUKTUK (HALIFAX)  --  An alliance of twenty Atlantic Canadian and Quebec environmental, Indigenous, and fishery organizations gathered today to express alarm that offshore petroleum boards would be given more power over oceans off Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence under the Liberal government’s plan to modify the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. 

We'll take a cup of kindness

For Auld Lang Syne, for old time’s sake, for our old friendships, and our new ones, we just wanted to toast you and say thank you for your support this year.

If you have not yet had a chance to make a donation, you can do so right here.

We’d be grateful for your cup of kindness.

Wherever you are today and this evening, be safe, and warm and happy.

Thank you for helping to protect our most precious planet.

 

A family matter.

Family. Food. Warmth. Safety. Home.

These are the things I’m thinking about in the intensifying few days leading up to the holidays.

It always makes me think about our families of wildlife, out there in the elements, finding their way. I’m in awe of their resilience, their own unique family and social structures, and how they have adapted over millennia.  I wonder how they do it.

Holding Steady for Justice for the Gulf

I wanted to give you an update on our critical legal battle and appearance in court this week to protect the Gulf of St. Lawrence and all of the beautiful creatures who live there.

The case involves one important argument:  the issuance of the licence that the offshore board has granted to the oil company, Corridor Resources. First though, we had to defend our ability to be heard, as “our standing,” is being challenged by the offshore board (responsible for granting exploration licences to oil companies), and by the oil company itself.