Prairie Chapter

Sierra Club Canada Foundation has been working to develop a network of community leaders protecting the integrity of Prairie ecosystems. Our dedicated volunteers focus on local issues important to their communities and act as proactive advocates for the environment. 

Prairie Flora Feature: Prairie Crocus

Today’s featured prairie plant is Anemone patens also known as Prairie Crocus, Crocus Anemone, Pasque Flower or Prairie Smoke. It is best known for being the first flower to bloom following winter, often before complete snowmelt has occurred, signalling the start of spring on the prairies. This long-lived perennial flower is native to Canada and grows on open prairies, along hillsides, roadsides, dry grasslands and open woods.

Canada's Prairie Pothole Region

The Canadian Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) encompasses 467,000km² of wetland and grassland area stretching from Alberta’s Rocky Mountain foothills to Manitoba’s Red River Valley. The appearance of these ‘pothole’ structured wetlands, were formed by the movement of glaciers across North America, where the ice melted into the pools that are now the potholes wetlands we have today. The formation of the pothole region took tens of thousands of years during the Wisconsin glaciation period.

Urban Prairie: Milkweed and Monarchs

Prairies have been reduced to just 1% of their former range, making it one of the most endangered ecosystems. One way you as an everyday citizen can help is by planting native prairie plants. This can be in the form of a whole prairie garden, or even just a few native plants in a small garden bed. The idea is to create urban prairie habitat in a place where it has historically been decimated. The prairie ecosystem when left alone or properly managed supports abundant biodiversity. Prairie plants provide food and shelter to the hundreds of prairie pollinators.

Native Prairie Week

Preserve, Protect and Celebrate Canada's Prairie Ecozone

Native Prairie Appreciation Week is officially celebrated in Saskatchewan from June 13-19 in collaboration with the Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (SK PCAP). It is celebrated nationwide from June 17-22. However, the Canadian prairies boast many incredible ecoregions, unique wildlife and stunning landscapes that should be celebrated all the time!

Sand Dunes, Meteorite Lakes, and Waterfalls: Jill’s Top 3 Manitoba Hikes

Paved, gravel, natural surface – trails take on a variety of forms. They can traverse great distances into the backcountry, travel through an urban park, or roam through local neighbourhoods. Historically, trails were used for the transport of goods and livestock between local villages and towns. Walking for leisure was a luxury, mostly reserved for those with garden paths or access to local forested trails. Recreational walking grew in popularity in North America at the end of the 19th century and gained traction post-war in the 20th century.

Lauren's Top 3 Saskatchewan Hikes

Paved, gravel, natural surface – trails take on a variety of forms. They can traverse great distances into the backcountry, travel through an urban park, or roam through local neighbourhoods. Historically, trails were used for the transport of goods and livestock between local villages and towns. Walking for leisure was a luxury, mostly reserved for those with garden paths or access to local forested trails. Recreational walking grew in popularity in North America at the end of the 19th century and gained traction post-war in the 20th century.

Parkland, Wetlands, and Rocky Mountains! Top 3 Alberta Hikes + Bonus Walk

Paved, gravel, natural surface – trails take on a variety of forms. They can traverse great distances into the backcountry, travel through an urban park, or roam through local neighbourhoods. Historically, trails were used for the transport of goods and livestock between local villages and towns. Walking for leisure was a luxury, mostly reserved for those with garden paths or access to local forested trails. Recreational walking grew in popularity in North America at the end of the 19th century and gained traction post-war in the 20th century.

The Prairie Living Room

The Prairie Living Room

Who could have predicted that in 2020 we would have to make to collective decision to stay inside our living room for extended period of time? These have been hard times for many.

We wanted to celebrate the hard decision our community has made to physically distance during Covid-19 by providing a new 'living room'. This living room is green, playful, beautiful and reflects our local flora. Now more than ever we need the benefits of nature for our physical and mental health.

Wild Child Edmonton Supports the Community with Distance Learning

Wild Child Edmonton Supports the Community with Distance Learning
“Covid-19 & Wild Child Together Apart”

EDMONTON (April 8, 20200 — Edmonton Wild Child of Sierra Club Canada Foundation is supporting Edmontonians by providing an online platform to connect and support with distance learning designed to allow students to build a relationship with nature with their familiesfrom home (e.g. weekly videos, online resources such as a blog and printable materials), and at the same time reduce isolation by providing families an opportunity to feel part of a community.

HASTY CUTS TO ALBERTA PARKS SYSTEM NEED TO BE REVERSED

For Immediate Release


Edmonton, AB - (March 9, 2020) Sierra Club Canada Foundation is deeply concerned about the degradation of Alberta’s parks and the impacts these changes will have for conservation, wildlife habitat, accessible recreation, and the status of protected areas in Alberta. Sierra Club Canada Foundation recognizes that habitat alteration and elimination poses the single greatest threat to the continued well-being of healthy and diverse wildlife populations. 

What Happens Now With the EPCOR Solar Farm?

Charles Richmond speaking with the press at Edmonton City Hall

Written by Jaclyn Layton

With over 72 square kilometres of lush river valley, Edmonton presents a unique intersection of urban and green space. More expansive than Stanley Park of Vancouver (4 square kilometres), or even Central Park in New York City (3.4 square kilometres),  Edmonton’s greenery is an aspect of the city that is celebrated, and therefore should be preserved and protected. The natural wonder of the North Saskatchewan River Valley has been at risk over the past 18 months over a proposed solar farm that would degrade the Valley’s natural state.