Grassroots Action

What makes the Sierra Club Canada Foundation so effective is our network of experts, partners and volunteers. Our chapters are engaged in many projects at the local level. Want to get involved? Contact our national office or your local chapter. If you have a dedicated group of members who want to lead their own projects within a region, you could start a Group. According to our organization's policy: Groups may be formed by any three or more members who wish to be active in their local community or within a larger geographic area, in relation to a particular conservation issue or issues, with the intention that the group exist on an ongoing basis. Otherwise, more time-limited local issues are to be managed within the auspices of the Chapter, or if none exists, then in co- operation with program staff working at the national level.

Trouble in the Atlantic Bubble

One of the many things the pandemic has shown us is just how interconnected we are with people, not only in this region, but around the globe. A virus can easily spread from one hemisphere to another in a matter of hours. The consequences, as we know, can be tragic. What’s less publicized is just how interconnected we are when it comes to the environment. Slowly, people are waking up to the reality of climate change, the loss of ecosystems and biodiversity, and the extinction of many species.

Investir dans une relance verte pour le Canada

En ce moment, nous avons une occasion unique de pouvoir rebâtir une société plus juste, meilleure pour notre santé, notre économie et la nature. Les décideurs à Ottawa sont en train de déterminer comment allouer les milliards de dollars de nos impôts, avec un nouveau budget fédéral qui arrive à grands pas.

Pour façonner un Canada qui répond à notre vision, nous demandons au gouvernement fédéral de prendre d’importantes décisions d'investissement qui :

Invest in a Green Recovery for Canada

Right now, we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to rebuild a just society that is better for our health, the economy, and nature. Decision-makers in Ottawa are currently determining how to allocate billions of our tax dollars, with a new federal budget just around the corner.

To shape the Canada that we want to see, we are asking the federal government to make critical investment decisions that:

All Hands on Deck webinar - Enbridge Line 5 Pipeline

No one shares more Great Lakes coastline than neighboring Canada and Michigan.  For 67 years Michigan and Canada have also had in common a dangerous pipeline that transports oil through the Straits of Mackinac. The Straits divide Michigan’s upper and lower peninsulas, connecting Lakes Huron and Michigan (they are actually one lake).  It’s turbulent waters, shipping hazards and poor conditions make the Straits the worst possible place in the Great Lakes for an oil pipeline rupture and Enbridge’s failures to exercise due care with Line 5 prompted Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to take action:  Line 5 is earmarked by the State of Michigan to go out of operation in May.


What are the facts about Enbridge’s Line 5 oil pipeline and its environmental threats to the Great Lakes?  Why is Michigan acting with urgency to stop the flow of oil in the Straits of Mackinac?  Representatives from the Sierra Club Michigan Chapter, the Bay Mills Indian Community and the Oil & Water Don’t Mix campaign will join Sierra Club Canada’s All Hands on Deck for a conversation about Enbridge Line 5.

The Sneaky Culprits Behind Air Pollution

So there I was on that sunny summer afternoon, just getting started with our Sierra Club Canada project, “Breathe Easy,” to measure air pollution all across Ottawa. I was working from home, all the windows open, when suddenly there's a cacophony of clattering noise starting up somewhere in the neighbourhood and a real stinky smell wafting into the yard and in through my windows. I investigate to find that a local hedge trimming company has unleashed a team of three ardent cutters on my adjacent neighbour's back yard. I close up all my windows and whip over to see what's going on.

Sand Dunes, Meteorite Lakes, and Waterfalls: Jill’s Top 3 Manitoba Hikes

Paved, gravel, natural surface – trails take on a variety of forms. They can traverse great distances into the backcountry, travel through an urban park, or roam through local neighbourhoods. Historically, trails were used for the transport of goods and livestock between local villages and towns. Walking for leisure was a luxury, mostly reserved for those with garden paths or access to local forested trails. Recreational walking grew in popularity in North America at the end of the 19th century and gained traction post-war in the 20th century. The environmental movement of the 1960s and 1970s further inspired people to seek time outdoors in nature for relaxation and fitness.

 

Nowadays trails are tourist attractions and community refuges for outdoor recreation. Whether planning a long-day hike to a mountain lake, or a short dog-walk close to home, I love to explore new and familiar trails.

 

A note about wildlife…

Wildlife can be encountered at any time while on trails. Human-wildlife coexistence is integral to safe and enjoyable recreation that also promotes wildlife conservation.

 

What is human-wildlife coexistence? 

It is a sustainable state that encourages the co-adaption of humans and wildlife that live in shared landscapes. Regarding hiking, it seeks to ensure wildlife conservation while promoting safe human recreation. When planning for your hikes, please keep the local wildlife in mind and leave no trace.

 

Jill's Top 3 Hikes in Manitoba:

Manitoba is ecologically much more diverse than people realize! Our province ranges from open prairie grasslands to Tundra and even borders an ocean! To outline some incredible variation in ecosystems I’ve chosen three hikes that represent three unique geographic regions and ecosystems. Black bears are common on some of the hikes that I am recommending, so make sure you know how to be wildlife smart and avoid interacting with bears. A bear habituated and used to being around people often becomes a dead bear – so being bear smart is about their safety and yours. Make sure to always check local advisories and warnings regarding weather and wildlife before heading out on your hike.

 

1) Hunt Lake Trail

Location: Whiteshell Provincial Park

Distance: 12.6km out and back

Elevation: 210m

Type: Moderate day hike

Difficulty: Moderate (rated as difficult due to the uneven terrain).

Website: Manitoba Parks

Ecozone: Lake of the Woods, Boreal Shield

 

The trail begins at the Hunt Lake Parking lot and follows the Eastern edge of West Hawk Lake for the majority of the trail. West Hawk Lake was formed by a meteorite impact, making it Manitoba’s deepest lake. As a result, the terrain around the lake is rugged a features granite cliffs along the trail. There are several sections of steep rocks, a few boggy areas (especially in spring) and the terrain is generally uneven. Make sure to wear hiking boots and bring bug spray depending on the season. The majority of the hike is in the shade and next to the lake, which is great if some of your hiking companions have four legs. Make sure dogs remain on leash while hiking, since this trail is in bear country.

 

You’ll encounter beautiful outcrops of granite and Precambrian Canadian shield all along the hike and see trees interwoven through the rocks over time. Along this trail you’ll find cedars and the westernmost Eastern White Pine in Canada. These giant Eastern White Pines tower over the forest canopy and can be easily seen at a distance. This ecosystem is known as the Manitoba Lowlands Natural Region, and the park is classified as a Natural Park – which means that the purpose of the park is to preserve this ecosystem.

 

At the end of the trail you’ll find a cook shelter where you can make a fire and enjoy the views. All along the trail you’ll find stunning views and places suitable to go for a swim on a hot day.

 Take your time to enjoy this hike and bring along a picnic to enjoy at the halfway point.

 

2) Pisew Falls to Kwasitchewan Falls Hiking Trail

Location: Pisew Falls Provincial Park (74 km / 46 mi. south of Thompson on PTH 6)

Distance: 27.4km loop

Elevation: 678m

Type: Multi-day hike, backcountry camping

Difficulty: Difficult

Website: Manitoba Parks

Ecozone: Hayes River Upland, Boreal Shield

 

Come prepared for this hike as wet weather can change estimated hiking times dramatically, and signage can be difficult to follow at times. Hikers can take the slightly shorter Philips Lake Route or the Grass River route to get to Kwasitchewan Falls, Manitoba’s highest waterfall. You’ll hike amidst pine, spruce, poplar and tamarak trees.

 Black bears, wolves and cougar are frequently reported in the area. Make sure to follow all hiking recommendations from Manitoba Parks and check out the First Steps section of the trail guide to know how to prepare.

Not quite ready for an overnight hike? No problem! This hike begins at Pisew Falls, which is easily accessible after a short but stunning walk along a boardwalk to the falls. The name Pisew is from the Cree word for lynx, as the hissing sound of the falls resembled that of the lynx. Continue along the Grass Trail lake side of the hike to follow a well-travelled route that Indigenous peoples showed to fur traders. Consider doing an out and back along this section of the trail, but be mindful to bring proper supplies and expect your route to take longer than expected.

 

Note: The backcountry campsites are also accessible by canoe.

 

 

 

3) Devils Punch Bowl – Spirit Sands

Location: Spruce Woods Provincial Park. From Winnipeg: travel west on Highway 1, turn south on P.T.H. 5 for 29 kilometres. From P.T.H. 2 west turn north on P.T.H. 5 for 13 kilometres. Kiche Manitou is approximately 180 kilometres from Winnipeg.

Distance: 10km

Type: Loop, day hike

Difficulty: Moderate

Website: Manitoba Parks Trail Brochure

Ecozone: Lake Manitoba Plain, Aspen Parkland

 

Note: There is an equestrian campground for horseback riders.

 

Photo credit: Lawrence Medel

 

The trail passes through a varied landscape of sand dunes, grassland and forested area. You’ll find several species of snakes in the park along with Manitoba’s only lizard: the Prairie Skink! The trail ends at the Devil’s Punch Bowl, which gets its blue-green colour and is fed from an underground stream. While the site is known as Manitoba’s desert, it actually gets nearly twice the amount of annual precipitation of what a desert would get. This results in an interesting combination of biodiversity and the varied landscape that makes this hike visually stunning. Go in autumn, when temperatures are cooler (shade can be limited along the trail) and the fall foliage is on full display.

 

The full loop is 10km, but there are several other options for trails in the park. Poison ivy is prevalent in the park – stay on the trail.

 

Photo credit: Lawrence Medel

 

 

Join us this Fall, as our team will be taking a special hike in support of THE NATIONAL HIKE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT.

 

This nation-wide event will help re-connect people across the country with the natural world that sustains us, while raising support for the challenging work of Sierra Club Canada Foundation and our efforts to fight for urgent environmental protections.

 

Want to be a Hiking Hero?

1) Sign up on our CanadaHelps page as an individual or part of the Prairie Chapter Team. 

2) Ask 10 friends to donate to your cause

3) Go for a hike! This can be on a mountain, on a favoured walking trail, indoors with your walking group, or even around your neighbourhood.

 

Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) under Assault

So far unreported in the press, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry has been under assault by the Ford government. This situation is especially tragic given the historic significance of its role in environmental protection. The MNRF has evolved to become the guardian of bio-diversity in Ontario.

Evolving out of the Department of Lands and Forests, MNRF, has been characterized by its conservationist use of science. The department’s work evolved from its Forest Protection Branch created in 1911 by the then-Chief Forester of Ontario, Edmund Zavitz.

Two Reviews Show Why Both Environmental Assessment and Conservation Authority Acts Should Be Left Alone

The Mohawk elder Danny Beaton (Turtle Clan) speaks on the threat posed by two environmental reviews in Ontario.
He warns,

“How many books have to be written about environmental protection or films made by David Suzuki, Ed Burtynsky, or Jacques Cousteau, before we create another environmental crisis? How many environmental disasters — Katrina, Bangladesh? How many mega projects do we need? There is an Earth crisis still unfolding from killing wild animals in China.