Atlantic Chapter

Sierra Club Atlantic is a vibrant grassroots organization that empowers people to protect, restore, and enjoy a healthy safe planet. We are your chapter of Canada’s only national grassroots environmental organization, working to bring your community’s concerns to the attention of regional and national leaders. Together, we are a credible, influential voice working to make a better world a reality.

What are we up to?

The Atlantic Chapter works through education and action to green the economy and protect the environment. We engage in projects designed to connect children to nature, protect wildlife and wild spaces, and to offer solutions to climate change.

New Federal Policy Statement on Thermal Coal Mines “a No-Brainer” 

For Immediate Release, June 14, 2021

The Sierra Club Canada Foundation couldn’t agree more with Federal Environment Minister Jonathon Wilkinson that getting off thermal coal is a “no-brainer.” On Friday, June 11, the Minister announced that the Federal government would make it harder for companies to obtain permits for new thermal coal mining projects in Canada.  

Suggested Reads from Decolonizing Book Club

Here are the books that were suggested by the participants during our first Decolonizing Book Club Zoom meeting on June 2:
  • Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer
  • Inconvenient Indian by Thomas King
  • Stolen Continents by Ronald Wright
  • Any Book by Richard Wagamese (examples: One Drum, Indian Horse
  • Five Little Indians by Michelle Good
  • Settler: Identity and Colonialism in 21st Century Canada, by Adam J.

"Every residential school site in Canada is a crime scene"

Wapna’kikewi’skwaq – Women of First Light sends our Prayers, love, and light across Turtle Island from the People of the Dawn. As Clan Mothers, Grandmothers, Aunties, and Mothers we are devastated and heartbroken by the news of the 215 beautiful children who were found in BC. Two hundred and fifteen future Clan Mothers, fire keepers, storytellers, leaders, and protectors that were taken brutally from our Nations. We Pray for their Spirit journeys as we Pray for their families and all our communities. 

SCREENING: INVISIBLE HAND - Rights Of Nature Documentary

Produced by award-winning actor Mark Ruffalo, INVISIBLE HAND takes you behind the curtain of the global economy where ‘Rights of Nature’ becomes “capitalism’s one true opponent.” In the fall of 2014, for the first time in United States history, an ecosystem filed to defend itself in a lawsuit claiming its ‘right to exist' in Grant Township, Pennsylvania. For attempting such a radical act, Grant’s rural community of 700 people were sued by a corporation, then by the state government, and are now locked in a battle to defend the watershed they call home through civil disobedience. The water they drink, the Rights to Nature laws they've passed are all on the line in this exclusive story.

Watch for Wildlife Driver Safety Film Launched Today in Nova Scotia

Watch for Wildlife - Preventing Wildlife Collisions Since 2016
How animal-vehicle collisions can be avoided while driving and what to do following a collision

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 4, 2021


Media Contacts:

Gretchen Fitzgerald, National Programs Director | Sierra Club Canada Foundation

902-444-7096, gretchenf@sierraclub.ca


Taylor Godin, Watch for Wildlife Coop Student | Sierra Club Canada Foundation

506-252-4602, watchforwildlife@sierraclub.ca

On the Art of Stealing Human Rights

These extracts are from a speech given by Gerry Gambill at a conference on human rights at Tobique Reserve in New Brunswick. In this speech, he warned Indigenous people about how society goes about taking away their human rights.

Can you guess what year this speech was given? Read on and we’ll tell you at the end.


Note: The speech was given at a time when the word “Indian” was used by government to refer to Indigenous people and it was common to default pronouns to he (him/his).

Here are a few new things we want to share with you as we go into the weekend

An Interfaith Coalition for Treaty Rights recently formed in the Maritimes in anticipation of the start of the Mi’kmaw moderate livelihood fishery. The coalition is made up of a group of concerned individuals and representatives of faith communities and social justice organizations.

SDGA Consultation Resources

On May 27, the Nova Scotia government announced that the long awaited public consultations on the Sustainable Development Goals Act (SDGA) were beginning immediately. While it’s a bit like being invited to a dinner party once the meal has already started, Sierra Club’s Atlantic Canada Chapter and other environmental groups are jumping in. 

Let's Talk About Land Acknowledgments

Land Acknowledgments have become more and more common in recent years and can be a great place to start as an ally for Indigenous communities and peoples. The term "ally" is defined by Sheree Atcheson as "any person that actively promotes and aspires to advance the culture of inclusion through intentional, positive and conscious efforts that benefit people as a whole." You can read more about allyship here.

Diverse Faith Groups to Pray for Mi’kmaw Fishery

In the days leading up to the Sipekne’katik First Nation’s plans to fish outside of the commercial fishing season, members of multiple faith traditions will be taking time to pray and meditate for two things: that the Sipekne’katik First Nation fishery will not be subjected to violence; and that Indigenous moderate livelihood fishing rights be respected.

Environmental Activism Has Been Around for a Long Time

The origin of the term "tree hugger"

The first tree huggers were 294 men and 69 women belonging to the Bishnois branch of Hinduism, who, in 1730, died while trying to protect the trees in their village from being turned into the raw material for building a palace. They literally clung to the trees, while being slaughtered by the foresters. But their action led to a royal decree prohibiting the cutting of trees in any Bishnoi village. And now those villages are virtual wooded oases amidst an otherwise desert landscape.

Job Opening: Watch for Wildlife Outreach Coordinator

We are seeking a dedicated and outgoing individual to help increase the reach and impact of our wildlife collisions prevention program, Watch for Wildlife (http://www.watchforwildlife.ca). The objective of the Watch for WIldlife is to prevent collisions with wildlife and people on our roads and to encourage the implementation of wildlife-friendly road design and vehicle collision mitigation measures.

Flawed environmental assessment of offshore drilling faces scrutiny in Federal Court

Environmental groups head to court to fight blanket exemption for exploratory drilling

ST JOHN’S, N.L./TRADITIONAL TERRITORY OF THE BEOTHUK AND MI’KMAQ –

Ecojustice will be in court today to challenge the federal government’s failure to properly assess the impact of exploratory drilling for oil and gas on ecosystems off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador, and its attempt to exempt all future exploratory drilling from assessment.

Trouble in the Atlantic Bubble

One of the many things the pandemic has shown us is just how interconnected we are with people, not only in this region, but around the globe. A virus can easily spread from one hemisphere to another in a matter of hours. The consequences, as we know, can be tragic. What’s less publicized is just how interconnected we are when it comes to the environment. Slowly, people are waking up to the reality of climate change, the loss of ecosystems and biodiversity, and the extinction of many species.